Educational Articles

Behavior

  • Aggression may be defined as any threat or harmful behavior directed toward another individual or group. Aggression in dogs commonly includes body language or threat displays such as a hard stare, growling, barking, snarling, lunging, snapping, and/or biting. There are many different categories or types of canine aggression including territorial, possessive, maternal/protective, pain-related, predatory, frustration, social conflict-related, sexual, disease-related, and fear- or anxiety-related aggression. The most common presentation of aggression is fear or anxiety motivated. The treatment of aggression will depend on the cause of aggression. Aggression should first be discussed with your veterinarian regarding the most appropriate treatment.

  • Anxiety wraps are vest-like garments designed to calm anxious dogs. The vests work under the theory that pressure applied to the dog's torso causes a calming effect similar to swaddling a crying infant or hugging a distressed person.

  • Dogs are natural scavengers and hunters so the use of food based activity toys is natural and stimulating. Activity toys have a variety of uses in behavior modification programs. Cats are natural hunters, so their toys will be most interesting if they are the size and texture of prey, if they can be moved around in such a way as to represent small prey (mice, insects, lizards, birds), or if they contain tasty food or treats.

  • There are a number of products on the market that can help with behavior management. Any products listed below are meant to be helpful suggestions, but please note that we are not affiliated with, nor do we specifically endorse any particular brand or product.

  • A bird may bite out of fear or aggression. They may be protecting their territory or asserting their dominance. Screaming or loud vocalization is a natural way for wild parrots and other birds to communicate with each other in their flock environments. They will also scream if they are alarmed.

  • Is there any truth to the old adage, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks?"

  • Dogs are smart. But how did they get that way and just how smart are they? Here are a few of the tests that canine behaviorists may perform in controlled laboratory settings aimed at learning more about how dogs learn and how much they learn and how often they apply what they've learned to certain situations.

  • Getting a puppy? What kind of dog do you want: big or small, long haired or short haired, pure bred or sweetly mixed? Have you located a litter of available pups? Do you know how to pick just the right pup from the litter to call your very own?

  • Though we won't ever get a first-hand account of their nighttime reveries, scientific evidence indicates that our canine friends do, indeed, dream.

  • Dog lovers consider big, mournful puppy eyes gazing at them to be heartwarming. Those soulful glances melt human hearts. But could those mournful eyes indicate that the dog is actually mourning?